• Welcome to Hoffman

    Your Kitchen & Bath Design Source

  • Welcome to Hoffman

    Your Kitchen & Bath Design Source

  • Welcome to Hoffman

    Your Kitchen & Bath Design Source

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10 May 18
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The average American spends 30 minutes a day in the kitchen and this statistic captures only the amount of time spent cooking. We spend a lot more time just hanging about the kitchen, doing dishes, cleaning up and hosting people. This means that the regular American kitchen comes in for heavy use. When designing or remodeling this space, you need to think in terms of how many people spend their time in there, how much space is available and what the big picture is. Your kitchen’s floor is one of the biggest considerations, and it has to be functional, capable of withstanding heavy use and   safe.

Below are some kitchen-flooring materials that actually work;

Ceramic tiles

Ceramic tiles give you the kind of versatility everyone looks for in a flooring material.  They come in a wide range of colors, sizes, patterns and textures, so you re spoilt for choice. In addition to that, this is an affordable flooring material that won’t leave your budget out of whack.

The kitchen is one of those spaces in the house where spills are commonplace, so you need a surface that is spill resistant and easy to clean, and these tiles give you precisely that. However, the biggest cons of all when it comes to ceramic tiles is that you can customize them to fit into your design plans.

Natural stone

Natural stone has a super classic appeal that is not only functional but  also efficient. Because of the nature of stone, you are also looking at a non-slip kind of flooring that reduces the eventuality of slip-and-fall accidents in the kitchen. Stone is a very respected item in the real estate business and significantly raises the value of your home should you decide to sell at a later date. Should you go for this flooring material, then you have at your disposal choices like quartz, limestone, slate, granite and travertine. Other upsides to choosing stone are that it is all natural and beautiful, durable and requires precious little effort to maintain.

Concrete

I know you think that concrete works in bunkers, basements and garages, but you need to hold that thought for a tiny, little while. Sure, concrete used to be known to be patchy and rough, but   this look has been perfected, and you can now get great concrete flooring for your kitchen. The thing about this material is that it can literally survive all kinds of heavy use   and is virtually indestructible. The downsides you are going to have to contend with when working with concrete is that it requires a professional to do and its customization is definitely going to drive the total cost of the project upwards.

Laminate

If you want the look and feel of a wooden, stone or concrete floor but don’t want to  drive up your budget, then laminate is the way to go. Laminate is an engineered material that is cost-friendly and easy to clean and maintain. The downside here is that when laminate starts wearing off in parts, the entire floor has to be replaced.

 

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Hoffman Fixtures Company
6031 South 129th East Avenue,
Tulsa, Oklahoma